OK? Okay, Time for a New Arrow



OK? Okay, Time for a New Arrow

by Darren Choate

OK? Okay, Time for a New Arrow.After having hunted antelope–unsuccessfully–in Arizona, my next hunt will be an archery whitetail hunt in Oklahoma with Bend of the River Outfitters. I will still be using my Mathews Halon 6, but I have scraped my speedy antelope arrow for a more efficient, energy arrow. For this hunt, I was looking for something that will approach 100% of the kinetic energy available from my set up with a momentum measurement approaching 0.50. Though kinetic energy (KE) has been the standard for years, I prefer to use momentum–a mathematical calculation of energy–to predict arrow penetration, rather than KE, which is a measurement of potential energy.

My bow stayed the same: 60-pounds at 27.5-inches of draw. To make the change in arrow, I went back to our Arrow Efficiency Calculator. Knowing I shot my 315-grain antelope arrow at 309 FPS, I entered that data to find the most efficient arrow weight for my new whitetail arrow. The results suggested a weight between 400- and 428-grains. With the disadvantage of my short draw length of 27.5-inches and my draw weight of 60-pounds because of a bad shoulder, I decided to go with the fastest arrow within that range, something right around 400-grains.

I then went back to our Arrow Weight Estimator, to search for the perfect energy arrow, and chose the Easton FMJ6. At 60-pounds and approximately 27-inches, the perfect spine was 390, which weighs 9.7 GPI. My completed arrow, with 100-grain Wac’Em, weighed-in at 403-grains. To complete the project, I fired a group of arrows through the chronograph, with the average of 276 FPS. Again, I entered this data back into the Arrow Efficiency Calculator to check my energy, and was pleased with the following results.

  • Mathews Halon 6 | Easton FMJ6/390 | Wac’Em 100-Grain Fixed
    • Speed: 276 FPS
    • KE: 68.10
    • Momentum: .4935

 

About the author

Darren Choate

Darren Choate is the founder of Western Whitetail. Prior to his outdoor writing and photography career, he served in the US Air Force, and then earned a Bachelors of Environmental Science and a Masters of Education. He has been hunting and guiding other hunters in the West for over 30 years. Darren is a voting member of the Professional Outdoor Media Association (POMA), and his articles have been featured in magazines such as Cabela’s Outfitter Journal, Quality Whitetails and Rocky Mountain Game & Fish. For more information visit his website at www.drchoate.com.