Carmen Mountain Whitetail

Carmen Mountain Whitetail

Odocoileus virginianus carminis

In 1940, a sub-species of white-tailed deer was discovered in the Sierra Del Carmen Mountain range of Coahuila, Mexico; thus the name Carmen Mountain whitetail. As their name suggests, they are able to use their size and habitat to their advantage to be as elusive as possible. The Carmen Mountain whitetail is a smaller deer that inhabits the mountainous regions of west Texas and northern Mexico. The population status of Carmen Mountain whitetail deer in the mountains of west Texas is stable. A large population exists in the Chisos Mountains of Big Bend National Park, where deer hunting is not allowed.

The Carmen Mountain deer have similar features to the Coues whitetail, but are slightly smaller. Just like all of their cousins, they have similar coloration and a flashy, white tail. A mature buck weighs about 110 pounds on the hoof and stands approximately 33 inches tall at the shoulder. Carmen Mountain deer have antlers similar to the Coues deer, but can actually be a little larger. A buck scoring 80-100 inches is a good buck and a buck scoring 110 inches is a dandy! In most cases, bucks have typical antlers with eight points or less. Although rare, some bucks sport non- typical antlers. The Safari Club International is the only record-keeping organization that recognizes the Carmen Mountain whitetail as a separate trophy.

Carmen Mountain whitetail deer can be hunted in Texas and Mexico. The Texas archery season begins in October, and the general season begins in November and runs through January, depending on the specific region. Be sure to check the Texas Parks & Wildlife regulations for specific hunt dates. A few hunting opportunities exist in Mexico, with a limited number of hunting outfitters.

Locations Found

Texas & Mexico Border:
Specifically, the deer inhabit juniper woodlands in the more mountainous regions of Brewster and Presidio counties of Texas, and similar habitat in northern Mexico. A few deer inhabit the Carmen, Chisos, and San Marcos mountains.

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