Gift Guide | Replaceable-Fixed-Blade Broadheads | Bob Robb

Best Fixed-Blade Broadheads – 2019 | Bob Robb


Gift Guide | Replaceable-Fixed-Blade Broadheads

by Bob Robb

G5 Striker V2G5 Striker V2: The Striker V2 is an upgrade from the original G5 Striker. With a bigger cutting diameter (1 ¼-inches), super sharp Lutz blades, Anix blade locking system, and a machine steel ferrule, the Striker V2 is stronger and bigger than the original – which was an excellent head in its own right — and flies better great. I’ve shot several deer and a few wild hogs with Strikers, and like them. A lot. For more information, visit www.g5outdoors.com.

Innerloc SliceInnerloc Slice: I’ve liked Innerloc heads since their first 100-grain Stainless head came up many moons ago. I’ve found it pretty easy to get them to tune and fly well with several different bow-and-arrow combinations. The Slice features patented tapers to precisely align broadhead rotation to standard carbon arrows, a 1-1/16-inch cutting diameter, .027-inch blade thickness, and weigh 100 grains. For more information, visit www.innerloc.com/product/100-grain-slice-3-pack.

Muzzy Trocar 3-BladeMuzzy Trocar 3-Blade: I met John Musacchia, Sr., shortly after he founded Muzzy Products Corp. back in 1984, and have been a big fan of Muzzy broadheads ever since. And so is the rest of America, as Muzzy heads are the nation’s biggest replaceable-blade seller. The company is now owned by Feradyne (which also owns Rage, among other archery products), and they have kept the line fresh and growing. Still, my go-to Muzzy broadhead remains the classic 100-grain Trocar 3-blade head. The Trocar line features a solid one-piece stainless steel ferrule and a right offset blade design, which helps produce consistently-accurate broadhead flight with right offset, right helical or straight fletching. The Trocar tip (originally designed in medieval times to penetrate chain mail) is known for bone-breaking penetration. For more information, visit https://www.feradyne.com/muzzy-broadheads

NAP ThunderheadNAP Thunderhead: There’s a reason I love Thunderheads (see above.) The late Andy Simo, who founded New Archery products and designed the Thunderhead, had a sharp mind and was a stickler for quality – and that’s what Thunderheads give you. They feature a Patented Micro Grooved Slimline Ferrule, which greatly increases flight accuracy, blades that undergo a Diamize sharpening process (just like scalpel blades) which creates a blade so sharp they scare me. I’ve always been able to make them fly, and they have never let me down. Ever. My most recent experience was in Idaho, where mechanical heads remain outlawed, so I shot a nice black bear with a Thunderhead 100. For more information, visit https://www.newarchery.com.

Wasp Havalon HVWasp Havalon HV: By now everyone knows about Havalon knives and their signature scalpel knife blades, right? Now, Wasp has partnered with Havalon Knives to create this new precision-made, replaceable-blade broadhead featuring a next-level degree of blade sharpness and stainless steel Trocar Tip. Other features include an aerodynamic, ultra-compact, aerospace-grade aluminum ferrule that facilitates field-point accuracy and easy tuning. The .035-inch thick surgical-sharp stainless steel blades provide a 1-3/16-inch cutting diameter. As with all Wasp replaceable-blade broadheads, the blades are easily replaced and each pack comes with three complete broadheads and 6 replacement blades. Available in both 100 & 125 grains. The heads are so new I have not had a chance to play with them, but given that Wasp’s Dick Maleski started the replaceable-blade industry back when Nixon was president, it seems fitting that Wasp would take it to the next level with Havalon blades. For more information, visit https://www.wasparchery.com/product/havalon-hv.

For more on mechanical broadhead design, read Bob Robb’s Best Fixed-Blade Broadheads article.

Bob Robb

Bob Robb has been a full-time outdoor writer since 1978, and a contributor to, and the editor of, several prominent hunting magazines down thru the years. He also lived 15 years in Alaska, where he held an assistant hunting guide license. The best part of his job, he says, is it allows him to be in the woods between 120-140 days a year; what could be better than that?